Whatever you're looking for can be delivered right to your door, in a day, in some cases, in just a few hours. So why make the trip to the stores when you can accomplish the same thing through a key tap or an app? This is the issue luring shoppers away from actual stores -- and the stores are feeling it. Some stores are staying alive online, but closing up actual shops, and the ones left standing have a lot of work to do. "These stores are trying to reinvent themselves to meet this new consumer economy we are in, " says Enrique Lopez-Lira, a professor of economics and finance at Grand Canyon University . "People don't want to go just buy something at the store. They are looking for an experience, lifestyle opportunity so the shopping centers are changing that way as well," says Lopez-Lira. Even the surge in residential condos and apartments are attracting people with the promise of a place they can "work, live and play." After disappointing holiday sales, Macy's announced it would close 68 of its stores across the nation, eliminating 10,000 jobs. MetroCenter mall was a first of it's kind when it opened in 1973, quite the contrast to what it is now. The new development group is hoping to add family apartments, corporate offices and a lot more there, hoping the eventual synergy will breath life back into this property.

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REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer French President Emmanuel Macron shakes hands as he arrives in Le Touquet, on the eve of the first round of the parliamentary election, France June 10, 2017. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer French President Emmanuel Macron and his wife Brigitte Trogneux (C) leave their home on bicycles in Le Touquet, France, on the eve of the first round of the parliamentary election, June 10, 2017. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer French President Emmanuel Macron arrives at his home on bicycle in Le Touquet, on the eve of the first round of the parliamentary election, France June 10, 2017. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer French President Emmanuel Macron's wife Brigitte Trogneux leaves her home on bicycle in Le Touquet, France, on the eve of the first round of the parliamentary election, June 10, 2017. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer PARIS French voters cast their ballots on Sunday in the first round of a parliamentary election expected to give centrist President Emmanuel Macron the strong majority needed to carry out the far-reaching economic and social reforms he promises. The vote to elect the lower house's 577 members comes a month after Macron, a 39-year-old former banker with little political experience, defied the odds to win the presidency of the euro zone's second-largest economy. If, as polls project, Macron and his fledgling party win a commanding majority in next week's second round, it will be another blow for the mainstream parties on the right and left which failed to get a candidate into the presidential run-off. "We want a big majority to be able to act and transform France over the next five years," Mounir Mahjoubi, a tech entrepreneur running under Macron's Republic On The Move (LREM) banner told Reuters as he canvassed support in his northern Paris constituency ahead of the vote. Opinion polls forecast LREM and its center-right Modem allies will win at least 30 percent of votes on Sunday. The conservative The Republicans party and its allies trail with about 20 percent, ahead of the far-right National Front on about 17 percent. Such an outcome would transform into a landslide majority in the second round, the opinion polls show.